Olga Shupyatskaya is a Belarussian-born American pianist and pedagogue. Winner of the Young Artist Prize of the National Federation of Music Clubs, first prizes at the Concours International de Piano du Moulin d’Andé in France, the Stravinsky Competition, the Southeastern Piano Festival in South Carolina, and a prize at the Thousand Island International Piano Competition, she is equally at ease in solo and collaborative repertoire. Her recent projects include interdisciplinary collaboration and alternative programming, incorporating new music, jazz, rock, and choreography alongside the classical music literature.

Shupyatskaya’s concert appearances have taken her to Europe, South America, and across North America, and include performances at the Bogotá International Piano Festival in Colombia, the Académie Internationale du Moulin d’Andé in France, the Burgos International Music Festival in Spain, Pianofest in the Hamptons, the Orford Festival in Canada, the Bowdoin International Music Festival in Maine, and the Southeastern Piano Festival.


In addition to her performance work, Shupyatskaya is a dedicated teacher and adjudicator. She has taught piano at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY, at the Eastman Community Music School, where she was awarded the Jack L. Frank Award for Excellence in Teaching, and piano-literature courses for piano-performance and accompanying majors at the Eastman School of Music. She has presented master classes at the Bogotá International Piano Festival, at Marshall University in West Virginia, and at the Ohio Federation of Music Clubs State Convention.


Shupyatskaya earned her Doctorate in Piano Performance and Literature with a Minor in Music Theory at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY, where she also completed her Master’s and her Bachelor’s degrees. Her principal teachers are Natalya Antonova of the Eastman School of Music and Terry Moran of the Cleveland Institute of Music. During the 2018-19 academic year, she makes her home in Amherst, MA, where she is a staff pianist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.